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About Myler Bits



There has been a Rule Change in Dressage. The bits listed below have been approved for Dressage Tests in FEI and USA Equestrian events. The MB-02 Mouthpiece Comfort Snaffle Wide Barrel, Loose Ring, Dee no hooks, and Eggbutt no hooks.
 

A Bit About Resistance

Does your horse resist his current bit? With resistance, your horse is not relaxed in the bridle.   Learn to recognize the signs of resistance:

  • Behind the bit
  • Inversion/above the bit
  • Not stopping/runningthrough the bit
  • Dropping a shoulder
  • Overactive mouth
Horses speak through resistance.  If you have any of the above signs of resistance, your horse is not relaxed and your communication to him is not as effective as it should be.  With resistance, go softer, offering your horse a bit with less points of  pressure.

Softer? Yes, softer, Most likely, your tendency is to use a stronger bit.  Perhaps that's what you've been told to do.  But do you know why?
Myler Bits has developed an easy-to-use bitting system that will enable you to properly bit your horse.  At any level of training.  Without resistance.  For effective communication between horse and rider, the secret's in the system.
 

Myler Bit Features


1. Hooks offer leverage with direct action type bits.  This feature rolls the mouthpiece forward and downward into the tongue and bars with rein pressure, encouraging the horse to break at the poll.  Most traditional ring bits only apply backward pressure into the tongue and bars which can lead a horse to resist.  The bit attaches to the headstall and reins with the rein or headstall going from the outside of the bit, through the slot and fastening as shown.  It will appear like a traditional ring bit from the side.

2.Tongue Relief/Curved Mouthpiece permits horse to swallow freely, encouraging the horse to relax.  Many traditional bits lie flat on the horse's tonfue, restricting swallowing, often leading to resistance.  With curved mouth-pieces, Myler Bits distribute tongue presure more evenly that traditional designs.

3.  Pinch & Restrict with a Release teaches the horse to relax at the poll and stay in his "comfort zone."  With rein presure, the mouthpiece collapses inward on the bars and rolls downward into the tongue.  Once the horse relaxes at the poll, the pressure is released and the horse learns to stay in the pressure-free position.

4. Independent Side Movement within the mouthpiece allows a rider to isolate and lift one shoulder.  With traditional bits, a rider is not able to cause pressure on only one side of the bit.  This can cause miscommunication and resistance.  With independent side movement, a rider can affect only one side of the bit, assisting in lifting a shoulder, for balancing, bending and collection.

How to Select a Myler Bit

Every horse and rider combination has specific needs and therefore, need an appropriate bit.  To properly bit your horse, it is essential to look at all the factors involved.

1. Horse's Mouth and Points of Pressure - You should be familiar with your horse's mouth, features and points of pressure.  Carefully take a look in your horse's mouth.  What kind of tongue, bars and palate does he have?  Also, be mindful of your horse's dental care, including annual dental exams.

Points of Pressure caused by the bit: 1) Tongue, 2) Bars, 3) Poll, 4) Curb or Chin, and 5)Palate.

2.  Horses's Level of Training - How advanced is your horse's training?  Select the appropriate Level or Levels.

Level One:

  • Beginning training or has little training
  • Learning basic gaits, transitions and obedience
  • Beginning to break at the poll
Level Two:
  • Basic training is established
  • Relaxed at poll, holds position when rein is released
Possesses more complex skills such as bending, collection, side passes and lead changes

Level Three:


  • Condisered broke or finished and is willing to do what is asked
  • Relaxed at poll
Possesses advanced skills; works well off of seat, legs and hands.  These general levels are coordinated to three levels of Myleer Bits.  Used as a guide, the levels are coordinated to three levels of Myler Bits.  Used as a guide, the levels will enable you to select the best bit for you and your horse.

3. Level of Bits - All Myler Bits mouthpieces are coordinated to the levels of training.  Some bits are appropriate for multiple levels.

Level One Bits

  • Feature curved mouthpiece for ease of swallowing.
  • Use tongue pressure and bar pressure - working mostly off the tongue.
  • Feature pinch & restrict with release.
  • May feature hooks, curb and/or poll pressure.
Level Two Bits:
  • Feature curved  mouthpiece with tongue relief.
  • Use tongue pressure and more bar pressure, with the mouthpiece rolling on the bars.  May collapse into the bars.
  • May feature hooks, curb, palate and/or poll pressure.
  • May offer independent side movement.
Level Three Bits:
  • Feature curved mouthpiece with tongue relief
  • Use mostly bar pressure; mouthpiece rolls downward on the bars.
  • Offer a variety of pressure points to take the horse as soft as they will allow.  May use tongue, curb, poll and/or palate pressure as needed.
  • May feature hooks and/or offer independent side movement.
4.  Resistance - Does your horse resist his current bit?  If so, your horse is not relaxed in the bridle.  Therefore, your communication is ineffective.  Learn to recognize the signs of resistance:
  • Behind the bit
  • Inversion/above the bit
  • Not stopping/running through the bit
  • Dropping a shoulder
  • Overactive mouth
With resistance, go softer, offering your horse a bit with less points of pressure.  Here's a few suggestions for resistance:
  • for behind the bit, try a bit with less tongue pressure and possibly Independent Side Movement.
  • for inversion, try a bit with tongue pressure
  • for not stopping, consider a shank or combination bit with leverage pressure and mouthpieces offering some tongue, bar and palate pressure
  • for dropping a shoulder, select a bit which offers Independent Sidie Movement.
  • for the overactive moutn, look for a bit which offers less points of pressure, especially tongue pressure.
5. Rider's Skill Level - Are you a beginner, intermediate or advanced rider?  What are your hands like? If you are building basic skills and/or have overactive hands, be mindful of bits which send too quick of a signal, including long shanks and/or straight shanks.

6. The Discipline - Do you ride English or Western?  A combination? Select a bit which is appropriate for you discipline.  And if you compete, be sure to check with you competition's governing body for which types of bits are legal in competion.

Transition Into a Myler Bit
Approach your horse's bit transition the same as you would his training - with time, patience and repetition.  Select the appropriate bit.  When switching to a Myler Bit, let the horse cause and release pressure and come into the comfort zone.  You may not feel the results of the bit for a week or so, but you may see changes sooner.

Guide to Myler Bits
Myler Bits can be categorized into three general levels.  Used aas a guide, these levels allow you to select the best bit for you and your horse.
Level One Bits: Level One Bits are designed to communicate with the horse that has little or no training.
1. Feature curved mouthpiece that allows horse to swallow.
2. Use tongue pressure and bar pressure - working mostly off the tongue.  myler Bits distribute tongue pressure more evenly than traditional designs.
3. Feature Pinch & Restrict with release - the bit collapese on the sides of the bars and comes down across the tongue.  When the horse relaxes at the poll, the pressure is released.  The horse learns to come into this "comfort zone." (May feature hooks, and/or offer curb or poll pressure.)
level one features

Level Two Bits:  Level Two Bits are designed to communicate with the horse that has basic training and is now learning more advanced skills.
1. Feature curved mouthpiece that allows horse to swallow.  May offer tongue relief.
2. Use tongue pressure and more bar pressure, with the mouthpiece rolling on the bars.  Some Level Two Bits may collapse into the bars.
3. May offer curb, palate and/or poll pressure. (May feature hooks and/or offer Independent Side Movement allowing the rider to isolate and lift one shoulder.

Level Three Bits: Level Three Bits are disigned to communicate with the finished horse.
1. Feature curved mouthpiece with tongue relief that allows horse to swallow.
2. Use mostly bar pressure, with the mouthpiece rolling downward on the bars.
3. Offer a variety of pressure points to take the horse as soft as they will allow.  May use tongue, curb, poll and/or palate pressure as needed.  Bit shown offers curb, poll and palate pressure. (May feature hooks and/or offer Independent Side Movement allowing the rider to isolate and lift one shoulder.)

Independent Side Movement: A unique Myler feature, Independent Side Movement allows one side of the bit to move independently of the other.

  • Rider can hold one rein steady and lift with the other, causing no effect on the opposite side of the bit.
  • Rider can lift a shoulder for balancing, bending, turns and collections.
  • For example, to properly lift an inside shoulder, rider should lift inside rein across the withers.
  • Works very differently than a traditional bit which acts upon both sides of the mouth often causing miscommunication between horse and rider.

 
 
 
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Also see our:

STAINLESS STEEL BITS

HAPPY MOUTH BITS

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